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Sat. May 25, 2024
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PSL: The Double Edge Sword
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Cricket, with its roots deeply embedded in the British colonial era, has evolved into a global phenomenon and has significantly influenced the economic landscape of various nations, particularly those with a capitalist structure. Historically, cricket gained prominence in the 18th century, primarily in England, as a genteel pastime for the aristocracy. However, with the expansion of the British Empire, the sport travelled across continents, becoming a symbol of colonial legacy.

In the context of capitalist economies, cricket has proven to be a powerful economic driver. The establishment of professional leagues and international tournaments has transformed cricket into a lucrative industry, attracting significant investments from corporate entities. Major cricketing nations, adopting a capitalist approach, have harnessed the sport's popularity to boost their economies.

The ongoing Pakistan Super League (PSL) showcased this passion on a global stage, attracting tourists, igniting national pride, and boosting the economy. However, while media portrayals often paint a picture of vibrant crowds and a booming tourism industry, the reality for residents surrounding the stadium paints a contrasting picture. The article argues that the security measures and logistical arrangements employed during the PSL come at a significant cost to the well-being of ordinary citizens.

There is a craze for cricket in Pakistan as it is a source of recreation for the clique of Pakistan and a good message for other countries that Pakistan is a safe country to visit. These days PSL is going on in the country and a large number of people are visiting and cheering their teams at the stadium. It is said that full-proof security and traffic plans are made to handle every situation related to PSL matches.

But this is the one side of the picture, which is displayed by the media, have we ever imagined what was going on with the residents of that area and others who were facing extreme difficulties due to matches? Hundreds of policemen and traffic officers were strolling over the roads, streets were deserted, shops were closed, and hundreds of people were waiting in a queue for half an hour to go to their homes. Then, you may suspect that something had happened in that area, no, they were just waiting for the teams to go into the stadium to play the match. Some people consider PSL as a haven, but I can bet this was hell for the people of the double road Rawalpindi where the stadium is situated.

In the name of policy and security plans, the Pakistani government was only exploiting its people.  One hour before the arrival of teams, all major roads of Islamabad and Rawalpindi were used to be blocked for traffic which created great chaos and problems for everyone who was traveling from those roads. That also caused traffic congestion due to which people spent hours of important time in that mess.

These were the problems of the people in the traffic but people living near the stadium and traveling through the metro were in worse condition than them. Commercial and day-to-day activities of the residents living near the stadium were suspended and would remain until the matches were going on, without any compensation. People who travelled through the metro spent hours stocking in the metro and waiting outside the station for its being operational.

What is the fault of these people and why they are paying the price for the entertainment of the clique of Pakistan? Are they not human or they do not owe any right to the government? Hundreds of thousands are being spent and thousands of policemen additionally with hundreds of traffic police officials are appointed to keep this entertainment g vibrant. I am not against the PSL, but I am against the acts that are undertaken by the government because if you want to make the image of Pakistan better and show that Pakistan is a safe country then the government should have to tackle its internal issue because by only exploiting the people, Pakistan cannot be made safe. On the one hand, terrorists are threatening the stability of Pakistan and on the other government claims that Pakistan is secure but for whom it is secure as we can see that it is only safe for a clique.

These issues should be overlooked by the policymakers as security is not only the problem of some exclusive people but also the problem of the whole nation.

M Ahmad is a dedicated article writer currently pursuing his studies at the National Defence University (NDU), Islamabad, Pakistan.

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